What are the pros and cons of Sitecore over other content management systems?

Sitecore is a powerful .NET framework and is almost entirely customizable down to its own user interface. It leverages much of what makes .NET great like the role-based security. It allows for a modular templated architecture based on data templates that if done correctly provides a developer with a code-less, do more approach in which content types inherit values and parameters and can be nested to fulfill complex business rules (hierarchical or otherwise) and re-used everywhere. Its API allows for almost complete control of the rendering pipeline, with database-driven content completely divorced from presentation allowing for customizable rendering rules like persona-based personalization, custom device delivery, multi-site (reusable architecture), multi-language and A/B and multivariate testing. Sitecore requires a lot of configuration however both to function as desired and in order to be easy to use. And therein lies the rub, by being so open, so configurable, many developers that cut corners also wreck the content manager’s user experience and make the whole solution difficult to manage, upgrade and deploy.

With its great flexibility for the developer then, comes with great responsibility. You can start with a great platform and get a lousy implementation. Developers who fail to treat the Sitecore platform and their website as an application and apply ALM best practices can easily create an undocumented mess of code and architecture. If programmatic rules are used rigidly without overrides, a content manager can feel hamstrung especially if tiny tweaks involve development and deployment (isn’t that the point of a CMS, to alleviate the need for development). HTML and CSS can be used in-line and hardcoded to particular front-end frameworks to a developer’s peril. However, if you build on a solid foundation Sitecore can act as the integration framework for all your web services, back-end processes, and customer analytics (via the MongoDB platform or xDB, experience database). A developer can build custom e-commerce experience, integrate with CRM, ERP, and manage content for non-sitecore sites, mobile apps and kiosks. If I were a company banking on providing a great user experience for my customers, partners and power users, I’d invest in Sitecore, but I’d also invest in a great technology provider to implement it.

Author: Richard Soares

I’m a freelance software developer with more than 20 years’ professional experience in web development. I specialise in creating tailor-made, web-based systems that can help your business run like clockwork.